THE DENVER POST
Friday May 18, 1990
EDWARD RODGERS, the ex-FBI agent who lost a $2.3 million judgment in Denver district court this week, must have been astonished when two of his grown-up daughters sued him for molesting them as children.

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GAZETTE TELEGRAPH SECTION B
Thursday, May 17, 1990
Sisters claiming abuse win $2.3 million Lawsuit was act of love, women say. Two believe family now can face reality

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THE BOSTON GLOBE
Monday, May 28, 1990
Giving the gift of going public
FOR YEARS, EDWARD RODGERS of Denver was a national specialist on child abuse. A lawyer, FBI agent and former child abuse investigator for the Denver district attorney’s office, he was instrumental in developing incest and child abuse statues. He went on the lecture circuit. he sat on various panels about child abuse. He wrote articles about abusers for various journals.

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THE BOSTON GLOBE
Friday May 18, 1990
Daughters win sex-abuse case against father
In a precedent-setting case, a Belmont woman this week won a multimillion-dollar jury award against her father for sexual and physical abuse. In an interview yesterday, she said she filed the suit because she wanted to let a "little girl" from beverly know that not everyone gets away with child abuse.

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THE DENVER POST - Voice of the Rocky Mountain Empire
May 17, 1990

Sisters win sex lawsuit vs. dad $2.3 million given for years of abuse
Two daughters of former state and federal law enforcement official Edward Rodgers were awarded $2.319,400 yesterday, after a Denver judge and jury found that the women suffered years of abuse at the hands of their father.

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THE BOSTON GLOBE
Sunday, March 26, 1989
Ruling in Beverly assault case leaves scars
BEVERLY - The case seemed straightforward. Michael R. Ferguson, a 41-year-old former shop teacher, had pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting his neighbor’s daughter on two occasions last year when she had spent the night at his house with his daughter.

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ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS - CIVIL LAWSUITS
Sunday. March 2, 1997
Sharon Simone and her sister were awarded $2.3 million (with interest) by a Denver jury for sexual abuse committed by their father. It took an act of Congress to garnishee their father’s federal pension. Abuse victims found justice in court. Dad’s federal pension open to garnishment after new law in 1994

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THE BOSTON GLOBE
March 28, 1989
(Two days following "Ruling in Beverly assault case leaves scars"
Man, 23, is jailed for mailbox blast

A federal judge sentenced a 23-year-old Framingham man to 29 months in jail for illegally transporting explosives and using them to blow up a newspaper vending machine in Needham last summer. Jonathan Tefft will serve the sentence concurrently with a state sentence he is now serving. Tefft was also sentenced to two years of supervised release yesterday by US District Judge Walter J. Skinner, who called him ‘not a terrorist,’ but a person with ‘some level of personal problems." Tefft was indicted in August on the charges.

THE DENVER POST - Voice of the Rocky Mountain Empire Final Edition
May 21, 1990
Adults suing parents for abuse
In Denver and elsewhere, child victims put an end to years of silence

WASHINGTON - When a Denver jury last week awarded two middle-aged sisters $2.3 million to compensate for years of physical and sexual abuse by their father, the case made front-page news.

The story underscored a changing fact of life: Until recently, relatively few adults have taken legal action against parents who abused them as children.

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THE WASHINGTON TIMES - LETTERS TO EDITOR
Tuesday, January 27, 1998
Recalling the facts about traumatic amnesia

Suzanne Fields’ column is replete with misinformation apparently culled out of a False Memory Syndrome foundation press kit (“The inexact science of the human mind,” Op-Ed, Jan. 19).

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The Denver Post—Voice of the Rocky Mountain News
October 27, 1994
Law lets abuse victims seek redress in pensions
A former Colorado woman who won a landmark $2.3 million judgment against her abusive father is celebrating a new law allowing her and other victims to collect compensation from their abusers’ federal pensions.

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The Enterprise- Brockton, Massachusetts
Friday, April 22, 1994
For abused, the healing comes from the telling
BROCKTON – Sharon Simone’s father was an FBI agent and a nationally recognized authority on child abuse prevention and intervention. At home, however, he physically abused her three brothers and beat and sexually abused Simone and her three sisters over a period of 30 years. “You never knew what was going to happen,” Simone said. “I don’t ever remember being relaxes in the family.”

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ROCKY MOUNTAIIN NEWS - LETTERS
Sunday March 23, 1997
Many people deserve credit for helping pass child accountability act of ’94
Rocky Mount News reported Sue Lindsay has done a wonderfully thorough job describing the difficulties crime victims have in recovering the damages awarded them in civil courts (March 2 article, “Abuse victims found justice in court”). Getting congress to hold perpetrators accountable by attaching their federal pensions t satisfy court-awarded damages is an important step. The Child Abuse Accountability Act of 1994 addresses the wrong done to crime victims who have won their case in court only to lose once again to the perpetrator who refuses to honor the court’s judgment and pay up.

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GLOUCESTER DAILY TIMES
February 11, 2000
Balance power: Work to ‘become the change you want to see.’
Last week, I was tempted out into the cold of the night – twice – to attend two community evens, a book reading and a lecture. First, I heard Greg Gibson speak about his book, “Goneboy: A Walkabout.” Then I heard Sharon Simone speak about her life, the story of a little girl who had been sexually abused by her father.

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